Warblers, Hawks, and Grebes, oh my (has that one been done yet?)!

DaLo, I have no doubt that you will get that last 8 this year.  This is the “busy” season and you already have some rare visitors on the list.  You just have to wait out the regular migrants and it will be all good! 😀

As for the owl comments, yes, that is exactly what I meant; sorry for the confusion.

I have never seen Red Knots or tracking flags, but your noting them made a proverbial light bulb go off.  A while back I was informed about a program tracking some Black Vultures and they were asking us to keep an eye out for any that had been tagged.  They mentioned that it would be easy to distinguish the tagged birds and I just assumed they meant that the vultures were tagged with leg bands.  I thought Their idea of easy is obviously different than mine because I’ll never see those little bands on a bird in flight!  I’ll bet those vultures were “flagged” versus “banded”… oops. 😕  Nevertheless, I looked for the birds in question and never saw any.  Ok, so there’s my story of the day. 🙂

Black-throated Blue Warblers… I saw a couple reappear at Turkey Creek eating none other than…

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Black-throated Blue Warbler

Ok, that one is admittedly cute with his beauty berry reindeer nose, 😀 but here’s a slightly more dignified photo…

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Black-throated Blue Warbler

Jo, I showed the photo of the Cardinal to my in-laws last night and neither recognized it right off either.  I wouldn’t have thought about it right off if I hadn’t seen the other bird (the one in the addendum) and been pondering the issue ahead of time.  It was pure coincidence that it showed up at the same time that I was questioning the appearance of what I assumed might be a youngster out of season. 😀  These birds… 😉

Your poor Blue Jays!  I agree with you on the fact that it’s a good thing the hawks are juveniles.  Aren’t sharpies about the size of a Blue Jay?  I have never seen one personally (that I know of, but that is the impression that I got from everyone on WLB, but I have a hard time imagining a hawk that “small”).  I know what you mean by cringing when you hear a bird at the window.  Most of my birds do all right avoiding the windows, but the Mourning Doves do not.  One evening, the Cooper’s decided to go after a dove and missed, but the dove hit the window and the hawk hit the storm door and scared us all half silly!  Thankfully no birds or windows were broken in the process and, although the yard was empty for a bit that evening, the birds in question flew away on stable wings.

SLB, first off, your stork photos are wonderful!  I especially love photo 4.  My experience is that Pied-billed Grebes are here in very slight numbers most of the year, but in greater numbers through the winter.  However, I am basing this on my trips to the Viera Wetlands (where I am excited to say I plan to spend a good chunk of time today).  I have never seen them at the shore, but the Atlantic waters are different from the Gulf waters from what I have seen.  (Remarkably I have only seen the Gulf once since I moved here in 2004 and it was right after Hurricane Jeanne came through.)  I do know that at the wetlands (which are essentially wastewater ponds), they seem to be very content and easy to photograph from a car on the berms.  They are about the cutest little water birds next to a baby duck, in my opinion! 🙂  Anyway, aside from the wetlands, I have seen only the occasional one in passing, swimming around in retention ponds.  If I get any good photos of them today, I will be sure to share.

Ok, I have to get a move on.  I have a race to run tonight for which I need to pick up packets and then it is off to Viera for a couple hours!  For now, I sign off with two pictures (the first good ones I have ever taken of one of these guys) of an American Redstart that I saw beachside last weekend.  I was shocked to see one right on the shore, happily munching on sea grapes!!

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American Redstart

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American Redstart

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